Ink pen pointing at the definition of law in a dictionary

Blog Post

Email this to someoneShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on Pinterest

What to Do Immediately after a Concussion or Brain Injury

September 6, 2016

A concussion is one the most common types of injury after a car accident, but they can also result from sports injuries, falls, or even regular activity such as doing work around the house. A concussion occurs when the brain is shaken or bumped inside the head. There is a protective fluid around your brain that usually keeps it cushioned, but a hard jolt can push the brain against the skull and cause damage. Concussions are actually a form of traumatic brain injury, and although the effects can vary, it’s important to seek medical attention promptly if you think you have suffered from a concussion. Without proper diagnosis and treatment, blood clots and additional damage can occur. The CDC estimates that 30% of all deaths from injuries are due to some form of traumatic brain injury.

Concussion Symptoms

Someone with a concussion may have passed out during the incident, but remaining conscious doesn’t rule out the possibility of a concussion. Other symptoms generally appear within 24 to 48 hours of the incident. There are many possible symptoms, so it’s best to get a medical professional’s advice. The most recognizable symptoms include amnesia, confusion, and seizures. Other symptoms may seem less serious, like a headache, nausea, slurred speech, or dizziness, but those can all be signs of a concussion as well.

Immediate Actions You Should Take after a Concussion

If you’ve been in a car crash or suspect a concussion, the first step is to get medical help right away. You’ll also want to have someone else drive you home because a concussion can slow your response times. Don’t take pain relievers like ibuprofen or naproxen unless you’ve already spoken to a doctor—they can increase the risk of bleeding in your brain.

Recovering from a Concussion 

Your brain needs rest to recover from a concussion or traumatic brain injury, so avoid stressful physical and mental activity at first. In addition to getting lots of rest, you should also avoid drinking alcoholic beverages since they may slow your recovery. Because a concussion can affect your cognitive function, avoid making any big decisions until your brain has recovered. You should also take it slow returning to your normal activities. Just because the symptoms are gone doesn’t mean your brain is fully recovered. Healing takes time!

While you may think you can shake off these symptoms in a few hours or a day, it’s best to go to the doctor, get an accurate assessment of your health, and establish a realistic timeline for your recovery. Some people may recover quickly, while others need additional care to avoid more serious injury.

The Law Office of William D. Cook: Helping Concussion Victims

If you or a loved one is experiencing symptoms of a TBI or concussion after a car accident, or if you feel you may have been in a situation that potentially caused a brain injury, don’t wait to get help. Contact the Law Office of William D. Cook, and we’ll make sure that your personal injury case gets the expert analysis and legal support it deserves.

We offer free consultations to listen to your story, discuss your legal options (including whether you may be entitled to compensation), and help you decide what your best course of action is moving forward. Call (800) 757-7757 or fill out our convenient online contact form today to schedule your free consultation.

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016, January 22). TBI: Get the facts. CDC. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/get_the_facts.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016, January 22). What can I do to help feel better after a mild traumatic brain injury? CDC. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/recovery.html

Figler, R. (2012, August 24). Suspect a concussion? What you need to know. Cleveland Clinic. Retrieved from https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2012/08/suspect-a-concussion-what-you-need-to-know/

What should you do if you think you have had a concussion? (2015). Brainline. Retrieved from

http://www.brainline.org/content/2012/06/what-should-you-do-if-you-think-you-have-had-a-concussion.html

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *